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May 21, 2017
In the Pea Patch
A Note from the Farmer's Wife
Pea patch
The Farmer and the Farmer's daughter have a pea patch together. One of the best treasures of the early summer lies within a crisp, green pod: the sweet pea. One of the most satisfying vegetables to grow, this became a perfect project her to try out her gardening skills. In February she seeded her own tray of peas, and watched with excitement when they sprouted and began to grow. Together, father and daughter transplanted the babies into straight rows, mulched them with straw and strung the first few rows of string. Most peas are climbers. Their tiny prehensile tendrils seek and find the string as if by some hidden perception. As the plants grow in stature, additional strings are added, encouraging them to reach to the sky, so that later their juicy green pods are easy to pluck. Peas thrive in cool weather and in our zone this means they are short-lived. The most perfect patch can be thwarted by a week of hot, dry weather. When temperatures rise, the peas get fat and bitter - a disappointing trick of nature for the young farmer. This year's patch looks marvelous. If all goes well we will be picking peas for more hours than you can imagine. All you have to do is open that CSA box and yum them up!

Tips on growing your own peas: it is late to plant peas, but still a fun project with kids. Purchase sugar snap peas for the quickest and most child-gratifying experience. Soak the seeds overnight for a jumpstart in germination. Simply fill a glass half full with water and add pea seed. In the morning, strain off the water and you are ready to plant. Peas are as happy in a large container as they are in the soil, so if you lack garden space, a pot will work nicely. Fill with potting soil and have your child poke holes about 1 inch deep all around the surface. You can squeeze a lot of peas in one pot, so don't be shy. Drop eat seeds into the holes, cover and water gently once or twice a day. Once they are sprouted they will appreciate a stick or pole to climb up, but are happy to sprawl all over the ground too. Once the white blossoms appear you won't have long to wait for the delight of the first sweet and crunchy pod to appear. The wonderful thing about the sugar snap pea is that they can be eaten pod and all, no shelling necessary. Even if you only reap a handful, the experience is magical - even for the Farmer and his daughter!
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May 6, 2017
Grow Veggies Like a Boss
or like the Farmer at least!
Ready to get in the garden? Red Earth Farm will be offering plants again through our annual Plant Sale in May. Who can order? ANYONE! Where will your plants be delivered? To the closest Spring Share Site - if your site does not host a Spring Share, let us know where you would like to pick up. When will your plants be delivered? Wednesday May 17. Ordering starts Thursday May 11...details on how to order if you do NOT have a Spring Share will be coming soon.

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April 9, 2017
The Good Ol' Days
By Charis Lindrooth
Once upon a time Red Earth Farm sat on a 14 acre plot of land, with just over 4 acres in vegetable production. So many heads of lettuce have been harvested since that time, maybe 100,000? That’s just a Farmer’s Wife’s guess, so we will see what the Farmer says when he hops off the tractor and reads this. Back then a collection of old bent kitchen paring knives constituted the tools for harvest. Now we use slick machetes with fat yellow handles. And now we cultivate over 30 acres in produce.
Sometimes the Farmer reflects on the “good ol’ days.”
Things didn’t always run smoothly, and the quality of the produce lagged behind our standards today, but a sweetness blessed those early days. One of the best things about those times, were crew lunches. We shared our housing with several employees and took turns cooking a hot lunch for the entire crew. Rickety tables, and even more rickety chairs set up outside were laden with steaming curried greens, homemade cornbread, vegetable soup and always the ever present salad. If the salad arrived on the table as a simple pile of lettuce, we called it a “George Salad” because crew member George lacked creativity or inspiration when making salad. Promptly at 1pm a hot, sweaty crew would pile down the hill from field to table, and while plates full of food circulated, the banter began.
I savored these moments.
Featured topics included politics, much less eventful in those days, TV shows from the 80s and the secret lives of our chickens. Ian, a red-haired Johnny Appleseed sort of fellow, teased the kids about "Chuckles the Chicken" who was always calling his cell phone. Todd, Ian’s counter-part, strummed his guitar and crooned songs like Long Black Veil as the tea kettle whistled: hot tea after every meal for the Farmer, no matter how hot the day.
While the intimacy of those days have disappeared, a strong camaraderie still thrives among the crew. The challenge of long rows of a single task, be it bean-picking, tomato-stringing or cultivation with the hoe, becomes a backdrop for friendships that endure. Crew lunches still happen, now in the new lunch room, albeit no hot fare prepared by the Farmer’s Wife.
And once in a while you still might hear the notes of Old Joe Clark, when the Farmer is feeling sentimental and can spare a moment to pick up his banjo.
Sometimes it feels like the Farm has grown up, just like a child ready for college. We can't help but feel excited about the potential this "child" holds, but a little worry about pitfalls and a little wistfulness for what once was, the pitter-patter of little feet, as it were, seems appropriate.
CSA shares are available for Spring and Summer seasons. Join our "Farmily!"
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February 22, 2017
Win 2 Tickets to our VIP Farm-to-Table Dinner!
By Charis Lindrooth
It's CSA week and Friday is officially national CSA Day! Yay!! We'd like to celebrate by raffling off 2 tickets to our gourmet VIP Farm-to-Table Dinner (date and time TBA). How do you enter? The lucky winner will be randomly selected from all who have signed up previous to midnight Feb 24 (Friday). If you are registered for 2017, you're in the running. If not, now's the time! Sign up here!
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December 31, 2016
Vegetables Still Make Sense
By Charis Lindrooth
I wrote a post about food for my health blog yesterday. I started the post thinking about the plenitude of internet information about diets and how one food can be vilified on one site and glorified as a cure-all on another.
If you read the post, or run your own google search, you will quickly find a number of foods we used to think of as healthy on the unhealthy list now, and vice-versa. Hot debates on these foods include whole wheat, gluten, grains in general, beef, butter, coconut and eggs. It’s enough to make your head spin.
Smugly, when I started the post, I thought to myself that vegetables are about the only food immune to the see-saw of cans and can'ters. But that’s not true either: try cabbage, or other brassicas, spinach, Swiss chard, tomatoes, potatoes and beets. Seems like with a little research you can determine that absolutely no food is good for you.
I have spent several decades as a natural health care practitioner, helping people sort through the bombardment of information surrounding what to eat. While I love to read the research, sometimes we need to take our nose out of the books and internet and use common sense.
Without a doubt one of the surest ways to improve your health in general is to eat more vegetables. Whether you cook them, eat them raw or throw them in your VitaMix, most of us have more room on our plates for more fresh vegetables.
Take things a step further and prepare your food with care and thoughtfulness. Share it with friends and family, with conversation and laughter. I have no doubt that these factors play a role in the nutritional outcome as much as the chemical makeup of the food itself.
Now that winter has fully descended upon the farm, I am faced with shopping for my vegetables. While much progress has been made in food transport and flavor preservation, salad mix in a box just doesn’t inspire me the same way as our own. I think most of you would agree, nothing beats the taste of just-picked, local farm fresh produce.
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May 10, 2015
Does Mom Still Tell You to Eat Your Vegetables?
A Note from the Farmer's Wife
Once upon a time there was a little girl who didn't really like peas. Or cooked carrots. Or lima beans. Or most vegetables. Then she grew up and planted a garden, the one with the groundhog in it. And now she is the Farmer's Wife and she could consume a partial share or more by herself. How on earth do we get our kids to eat more vegetables? Or at least grow up and start eating vegetables.
Maybe I was lucky. Or maybe my early childhood radish growing experience with my Dad, infused a love of vegetables that blossomed when I graduated from college. When I started my first garden, I was obsessed with peppers and broccoli. Not obsessed with how they tasted. Just how they looked and how pretty and awesome they would be in my garden. I actually hated peppers and was on the fence about broccoli, when it came to actually eating them. I grew them anyway. My first head of broccoli was GIANT and I was so thrilled! The massive plant that gave birth to this miniature tree was a sight to behold. I had never seen anything like it. Something about this miraculous plant inspired me to eat it. The depth of flavor, the unexpected sweetness and the connection to its short life cycle directly affected my palate. Delicious! Inspired by this success I forced myself to eat the peppers from my garden until my pscyhe realized, "These are amazingly delicious!"
The Farmer's daughter won't touch a green thing on her plate. But take her into the greenhouse and she will graze like a horse. I have witnessed her eat five whole peppers at once. This Spring she discovered the sweet apple flavor of the Hakuri salad turnips. I think she ate two dozen, yanking them up and shaking off the dirt.
We all have tricky tricks in our back pockets to disguise vegetables and bribery of yummy desserts to convince our sweet cherubs to consume ample quantities or leafy greens. But I am guessing that the most potent trick of all is to connect with the magic of nature. "Come see the vegetables growing. Pick them. Taste them as soon as they come from the ground. Get your hands dirty. Sit on the sweet brown earth and eat to your hearts content." This is my modern replacement to the Mother's chiding words, "Eat your vegetables!"
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